Red Wine Runner

A Scottish Running Blog

Category: Race Reports (page 3 of 20)

Strathearn Marathon 2016 – RACE REPORT

Strathearn Marathon
12th June 2016

strathearn marathon

4 hours 20 minutes 28 seconds
105th of 153 finishers
36th of 59 Females
16th of 26 Female Seniors

After the sudden news that I had got a new job and would be moving to Edinburgh within a fortnight, I had to re-think my plans for attending the Strathearn Marathon.  After completing my first week at work, I got the train home to Stonehaven on Friday night; I spent a lovely 33 hours with my husband before getting collected by Naomi at 6am on Sunday to head down to Comrie for the race. The plan was to enjoy some quality running and then I’d get a lift back to Edinburgh  with Sandra and Ian. I was glad to have sorted out a plan, and despite it being a little galling to say farewell to Kynon at 6am knowing I wouldn’t see him for another two weeks, there was little else to do other than saddle up and get on with it.

The weather was grim; proper dreich, foggy, drizzly and a little cold. The Strathearn Marathon is renowned for its views but it became apparent that we’d be seeing very little of them during the race. We arrived around 7.45 and got quickly registered before catching up with some friends and familiar faces. One of the great things about this small, friendly race, is that you are offered the option of personalised drinks bottles, which are taken to 10 and 18 miles. These were deposited at the start and the system was flawless.

At 8.55am we lined up in the drizzle and listened to the briefing. Mark Beaumont was the guest of honour and when the gun went off, he led us on his bike on a circuit of the Cultybraggan Camp for the first quarter mile. After returning to the starting line and crossing for the second time, we headed out of the Camp and out on to the back roads for the rest of our 26.2 mile adventure.

Strathearn Marathon

Picture by Ali Robertson

Shortly afterwards we started climbing steadily; much of the first five miles is up hill. Naomi, Kate and I ran together and maintained a steady pace. No-one was looking to set any PBs and Naomi and I had planned to use the race for a good catch up! After the course leveled off, it turns onto a slightly more major road, so common sense dictated that we ran in single file. This rather quelled the conversation but we kept plodding away despite the increasing rain.

Strathearn Marathon

Picture – Gordon Donnachie

It began raining very heavily and soon I was absolutely soaked through. There were quite a few exposed miles where the wind made me pretty cold and I was glad I had a long sleeve top on to stay a little bit warm. I continued to chat to Naomi every so often but didn’t get much response – I had figured she was just battling on in her own head, until I turned around at about 9 miles and saw it was a totally different lady behind me! Oops. It’s a shame my chat was so bad she couldn’t even respond to tell me she wasn’t who I thought she was.

Strathearn Marathon

Picture – Gordon Donnachie

As the heavy rain continued I just pushed on alone in my thoughts and the miles ticked by. I was surprised at how good I was feeling and nothing was hurting at all. I ran a couple of miles with Kate before we separated at the 15 mile water point, and then I had a great few miles where I just bounced along and began passing people one by one. I felt I got stronger in the second half and this was reflected in my eventual finishing time, which was a 2:12/2:08 negative split – a first for me at marathon distance!

Strathearn Marathon

Picture – Gordon Donnachie

I had a really strong finish which was I very pleased about; this race could have very easily turned out to be a bit of a suffer-fest as I really have not put the work in this year to merit a strong road marathon performance. 4 hours 20 minutes is 22 minutes off my PB, but for someone who has done two runs over 15 miles since last September (one in January, and one in May), has run just over 400 miles this whole YEAR, and has been carrying around an extra stone in weight for months…it’s not too bad. I wanted to use the race as a benchmark for improvement for the rest of the year, so at least I know what I’m working with. Like some report cards at school used to say… “If Rhona actually bothered to TRY, she could be quite good at [subject] but she doesn’t seem to wish to concern herself with effort”

Strathearn Marathon

So, this summer, armed with my new size ‘Large’ club vest (my Medium one is too tight now) and stinging memories from Sunday of what inner thigh chub rub feels like (I have raced 100s of miles in the above pictured black skort and that has never been an issue before) I will be attempting to shift the lard and relocate the athlete I was a year ago when I earned my West Highland Way Race goblet. Eight months of unemployment has not been kind to my body or my mind, so I really hope that I have turned a corner with my new life in Edinburgh and I can start building these aspects of myself back up again.

I think it’s important to acknowledge that not everyone starts doing ultras and then makes it their life’s work. After my first ultra in 2012, I have consistently ran several marathons and ultras each year until 2016, where due to a couple of triggering factors I kind of just fell off the wagon. Bloggers and tweeters and many other online influencers might have you believe that once you start doing ultras and you’re in the scene, you just keep doing them all the time and it’s super easy and fun to do massive runs or races every other week; hashtag #trailporn hashtag #ultralife hashtag #zerolimits… Apart from the fact that a #zerolimits #ultralife is quite hard to fully execute when you have #zerobalance in your bank account, sometimes in life, much like in these races themselves, you go through bleak patches and you just have to keep knowing and believing that at some point you’ll probably come out the other side. I’m not really out of it yet but today I feel like I’m a lot further along than I have been lately.

Devil o the highlands footrace 2015

This weekend it’s my absolute favorite weekend of the year – the West Highland Way Race. This year I’m crewing for a guy from Los Angeles called Steve who I only met for the first time on Tuesday! It will be yet another way to experience the race through a visitor’s eyes and I simply cannot wait to head over to Milngavie tomorrow night. As usual there are dozens of friends taking part or crewing who I’m excited to see, and I’m ready for another adventure. Good luck to you if you’re taking part, or crewing – both are huge challenges!

Glen Lyon Ultramarathon – RACE REPORT

Glen Lyon Ultramarathon

Glen Lyon Ultra

7th May 2016
6 hours 26 minutes 14 seconds

60th of 77 (81 starters)
19 of 30 Females

The Glen Lyon Ultramarathon is the newest race in the BaM Racing portfolio. Billed as a 30 mile run in one of the remotest parts of Central Scotland, it was being ran for the first time in 2016 with a limited field size. Anyone who has done a BaM event before knows that they are in for a treat, so I signed up without hesitation when the race opened in February.

Glen Lyon is as remote as it is beautiful, so we booked into a hotel in Aberfeldy for the night before the race. In direct contrast to everything which went wrong with our trip to London for the marathon, this overnight stay could not have gone better. We stayed at the Aberfeldy Townhouse, an immaculate and comfortable boutique hotel with the most amazing customer service I’ve ever experienced outside of the USA. Pre-dinner beverages were taken at the Fountain Bar in the town square, with its outside seating area providing a comfortable place to soak up the warmth of the golden hour. Dinner was at the Three Lemons, a bar and brasserie that would not have been out of place in a fashionable neighbourhood in any city, and we enjoyed some huge and delicious stone-baked pizzas before retiring back to our hotel for an early night.

Glen Lyon Ultra 1

The next morning we were awake just after 6 and headed down to the restaurant for a pre-arranged early breakfast at 7am. Since they do not serve breakfast until 8am on the weekends, the hotel manager had very kindly offered to prepare us a breakfast roll and some coffee to prepare us for the day ahead. In actual fact, the staff had come in early, the whole breakfast buffet had been set up, including warm pastries fresh from the oven, and we were given two overflowing rolls each, served with fresh coffee and several rounds of toast. As ever my eyes were bigger than my stomach and I was well and truly stuffed with we left the hotel at 7.30am.

Glen Lyon Ultra 3

The 23 mile drive from Aberfeldy to Glen Lyon took over an hour, much of which is on treacherous and windy crumbling single track road. With no phone signal or means of communications other than the Race Director’s emergency satellite phone, this race was well and truly off the grid.

Glen Lyon Ultra

We arrived at the Dam at 8:45 which was just enough time to get registered, choose which layers to wear, and say hello to an assortment of friends. The weather was more or less perfect but there was a chilly wind which kept things cool as the sun was hidden behind haze.  I went for my new long sleeve Tracksmith top over the top of a tshirt, with various peripherals packed in my race vest.

Glen Lyon Ultra

Picture – Fiona Rennie

Glen Lyon Ultra

At 9:15am there was the briefest of briefings before the whistle went at 9:30am to set us on our way. There was half a mile of road to run on before a swift turn uphill for a long march up towards the Dam.

Glen Lyon Ultra

Picture – Susan Addison

The race is, to borrow the words of Dougie, a race of two Glens. The first half takes in the entire circumference of the dammed Loch Lyon before bringing the runners back to race HQ for a check point. The road was an undulating rocky landrover track which you could never quite relax on – the uneven terrain made it easy to lose your footing and stumble. With stunning views the whole way around it was easy to get distracted.

Glen Lyon Ultra

Glen Lyon Ultra

Glen Lyon Ultra

The heat slowly rose in the Glen and I quickly found myself losing my outer layers. This meant that the several river crossings were welcome relief, especially the handfuls of fresh spring water I splashed on my face to cool down with. Unsurprisingly, I hadn’t been hungry at all after my big breakfast, but was drinking a lot of water.

Glen Lyon Ultra

Glen Lyon Ultra SA 2

There was a water point at 9.5 miles right at the far end of the Loch before we headed back towards HQ. I said hello to Iona and Donna before refilling my bottles and getting on the move quickly. I was aware I was pretty far back in the field but I didn’t care as long as I was feeling ok and running smoothly. I knew that today was not going to be a day for fast times or impressive running from my legs!

Glen Lyon Ultra

Glen Lyon UltraPhoto – Donna Leslie

Returning towards the Dam the headwind was very strong and I had to work that bit harder to keep a steady pace. I reached the Dam and the (theoretical half way point) in roughly 3 hours which was bang on target . Not knowing the course, I had guessed I might take between 6 and 6.5 hours to cover the 30 miles, but I knew that the second Glen, and in particular getting in and out of it, would be harder running.

Glen Lyon Ultra

Glen Lyon Ultra

Glen Lyon Ultra

Picture – Fiona Rennie

After leaving Race HQ we were back onto tarmac road for a long 2 mile slog up a steep hill,Looking towards the other side of the Loch, you can see where the path we had ran on  previously is hewn from the sides of the Glen high above the water.

Glen Lyon Ultra

After the long climb up there was a flat half mile as the road followed the contour lines before descending down into Glen Lochart. There was a water stop at around 20 miles before we turned off the road and onto a rocky trail high above the Glen. Looking down I could see little running figures on the bottom of the other side of the Glen on their way back; I did some quick sums in my head and calculated that the loop around the Glen must be about 7 miles in length, before the long and arduous haul back over the hill to the finish. Looking ahead down the Glen was daunting and my mental resolved wobbled a little; I was tiring and beginning to feel a bit sick, and it was obvious that  my lack of training was beginning to show.

Glen Lyon Ultra

Glen Lyon Ultra

The small field of 80 had long since spread out and I ran much of the race completely by myself. There were very few race markers required, so if it hadn’t been for the odd glimpse of a person far in the distance, I may as well have been out there completely alone. Miles 20 – 27 were really quite tough as I pushed myself on when I was fatiguing hard. My legs and hips were feeling ok; not stiff or hurting, and my feet were fine too, but I was just lacking the solid cardio fitness which usually makes these events a lot easier. Feeling nauseated really wasn’t helping either, but I just trucked on steadily, breaking up the miles in a 0.1 walk/0.4 run sequence. I was amused to pass through marathon distance at 5hr 12m 38s, which is only a few seconds off the time in which I completed my very first marathon.

Glen Lyon Ultra

Finally, the big pipeline which we had crossed 7 miles ago came back into site and I knew I had nearly completed my lap of the Glen. I began to steel myself for the 3 mile climb from the bottom of the Glen right to the top of the hill. I had caught up with Sue, a Wee County Harrier, who I’d spoken to one or two times before, and chatting with her made the first of the three miles pass a lot more comfortably. We reached the 20 and 27 mile water point where I had hoped to tickle Diesel the Dog for some puppy power, but he was fast asleep having had a big day cheering all of the runners.

Glen Lyon Ultra

Picture – Lois Simpson

After quenching my thirst I locked in for the last few miles and started an ultra stomp up the hill, huffing and swearing as I went. It was obvious the race was going to be well over 30 miles in distance, but at least I knew the last two were downhill.

30 miles came and went, and so did 31, but the finish line didn’t arrive until 31.6 miles – a slightly generous 50k. Running up towards the finishing arch was a lovely feeling, as was having Kynon’s arms to fall into once again. Thanks to Fiona Rennie for these excellent pictures.

Glen Lyon Ultra

Glen Lyon Ultra

I had a sit down and some more water, before putting on some dry warm clothes immediately.  I wanted to eat but the appetite just wasn’t there, so I had a cup of sugary tea to keep my blood sugar up. It would have been nice to hang around but we had to more or less zoom off straight away in order to drive back home to get to a birthday party that evening. I was nervous about the twisty road making me car-sick but in the end we were stuck behind the slowest van in the world so it wasn’t really a concern!

I would thoroughly recommend this race to anyone looking to step up to ultra distance running, but is maybe a little unsure of the flat and fast nature of the D33. This race gives all the scenery and trail running of some of the longer SUMS events but without the extra mileage. The event is sure to grow to be another huge success for BaM, so keep your eyes peeled for the 2017 opening date!

Miyajima Marathon 15k 2016 – RACE REPORT

Miyajima Marathon 15k

miyajima marathon logo

3rd April 2016

1 hour 34 minutes 3 seconds
Category placing: 16th of 53 Female Under 40
Gender: 23rd of 76 Females

In August 2015, with a little help from a tax rebate, I booked a two week long trip to Japan for myself and Kynon. It took a lot of planning in the intervening months to get the trip exactly right, but one of the first things which helped shape our tour was finding out that the Miyajima Marathon was going to be taking place whilst we were in the country. As usual I had searched on various websites to find running events to take part in, but it was a chance Google search which saw me stumble upon the website for this race, which is only in its second year.  Whilst it bills itself as a marathon, it is actually only 15k – I believe this is because the word Marathon translates roughly as ‘running event’ in Japanese. Anyway, it was small and cheap, and the route looked stunning! We quickly signed up to secure our places, and continued planning the rest of our trip.

I am planning on writing another post on our Japan travels, so for now we’ll fast forward to the weekend of the 2nd and 3rd of April which we spent in Hiroshima, which is only a 30 minute train ride from the Miyajima Island ferry. Accommodation during the time of year which we visited was both expensive and hard to come by, so we found that staying in Hiroshima rather than on the island itself was our best option.

miyajima marathon

We stayed at the enormous Mitsui Garden Hotel, where we enjoyed this amazing view of the city of Hiroshima from our room on the 18th floor. Hiroshima is a port city and from our room we could see out to sea and the mountainous islands which rose up from the water.

miyajima marathon

On the morning of the race we woke up very early and were on the move by 7am. First we had to take a tram to a train station, then a local train to Miyajimaguchi, where we could then catch the ferry across to the island. Having already spent four days in Tokyo and successfully navigated our way South to Hiroshima on the Shinkansen, by now we were pros at using the Japanese transport system, which is just as clean and efficient as you would expect.

miyajima marathon

image source: visit-miyajima-japan.com

We were using JR Rail passes to travel around Japan, and these passes included the Miyajima Ferry crossing which took around 30 minutes. The ferry lands near the famous Itsukushima Shrine ‘floating’ Tori Gate which stands out in the water and passengers get a stunning view as they approach. Miyajima Island is highly regarded as one of the most scenic  and historical sights in Japan, and is an incredibly popular tourist destination. You can stay on the island but most people come for a day trip, and like many other places in Cherry Blossom season it is absolutely mobbed from dawn til dusk.

miyajima marathon

On the day we visited it was cloudy but very warm and humid. Even early in the morning it was clear that it was going to be a hot race when we started at 10:30am, but thankfully the sun stayed behind the clouds for most of the day. I had been hopeful for a fast run; examining the previous years’ results showed that the female field seemed quite soft and the women’s winner had completed the 9.3 miles in  around 1 hour and 12 minutes. Prizes were awarded for the first 5 runners in each category, so I genuinely thought I had a good chance of placing, as I would normally run 9 miles in around 1hr 15m. There was a route map and course profile on the website, which other than a hill at the start, showed a reasonably flat course… It looked like the road followed the contour lines around the hills rather than go over them…

miyajima marathon

However, it’s fair to say that this route map, like many things in Japan; was not what it seemed!

miyajima marathon

Registration was at Miyajima Jr High School and we picked up out race packets and numbers easily. After sorting ourselves out we returned to the ferry terminal to store our belongings in a baggage locker as we had some things which were just a bit too valuable to be left in the baggage drop, such as passports, JR passes, etc.

miyajima marathon

We took a walkabout and warmed up on the first mile of the course. There was definitely a hill at the start but it wasn’t too scary and I was ready to start at the front with the fast girls and go out strong and compete. After returning to the start area we took some pictures, chatted to a couple from Glasgow (!!) and spoke to one or two of the other International runners – there were about 15 in total.

miyajima marathon

There was a mass choreographed warm-up which was hilarious, and then some J-Pop was performed live before the start which was all very enthusiastically received.  At 10:25 we were summoned to the road for the start, and at 10:30 we were on our way.

The heat was immediately an issue for me, even though the sun was behind the clouds. The air was humid and close, and the humidity rating was nearly 90% to complement the 23C temperature. I pushed through the first mile in 7:59 and the second in 8:46 which was pleasing, and felt that I was able to maintain that pace…until the route took a hard left and commenced a steep and nasty climb. The race was all on road, but suddenly we found ourselves navigating a set of relentless switchbacks which I’m not sure I would even enjoy driving up in a car. I chugged away hoping that it would be over quickly, but soon I found myself having to power walk with my hands on my knees. The climb was about half a mile long through thick forest, until we could finally tumble down the other side on another series of steep switchbacks. It took me a moment or two to realise that we would be returning on the same route, so this hill would have to be navigated for a second time…

Into the fourth mile I began to revise my plan. I had clearly underestimated the course and it was extremely tough, made tougher by the heat. I knew it was highly unlikely that I would still be in contention for a top 5 spot, and I was concerned that continuing to push relentlessly would result in heatstroke. I switched to self-preservation mode and took the pressure off so I could soak in my surroundings and really enjoy the experience. There were monkeys shrieking in the trees, eagles flying overhead and birds singing unfamiliar songs. The views from the top of each hill were heavenly; islands floating in the haze above the flat, azure sea. Running has taken me to some pretty amazing places and this was quite special.

miyajima marathon

A sweaty phone camera just doesn’t do it justice; the scenery was stunning.

miyajima marathon

The lead runner passed me at 3.6 miles on his return and went on to win the race in an eye-watering 58:56. With the runners on their way back in I was able to count the number of women ahead of me, but I lost count at around 10. I got a big high 5 from Kynon who was toiling away and  doing excellently, and I said hello to the people who I had spoken to before the start as they approached half way.

miyajima marathon

There was a water point here but unfortunately they had run out. Thankfully I’d been able to get a cup of water at around 3 miles, but I was still very thirsty! The return journey was just as stunning and up until mile 7 I was mostly leap-frogging with the same group of guys. Once I had crested the final monster hill I knew I had two and a bit miles to go on mostly flat road, so I decided to focus on clawing back as many places as possible. A girl had motored past me which spurred me on and I chased her all the way to the finish as we both passed about a dozen men.

In the last 500 meters before the finish there was a gradual decline and I realised I was gaining on the girl. I realised if I timed my sprint finish attack right I could probably pass her, and claw back one female place. At the end of the slope I used the momentum to launch into an aggressive pace for the last moments of the race and passed her assertively to cross the finish line one spot higher, as 16th female and second international female.

I collected a bottle of water and my post-race food – an onigiri (sushi rice wrapped in seaweed) and a ‘Momiji Mangu’ which is a cake shaped like a maple leaf filled with flavoured bean paste and a local Miyajima specialty. Kynon greeted me with a sweaty hug and told me that he finished in 1hr 21m. We were both wiped out and needing a lot of water; not surprising as the the total elevation of the 15k course was 1640 feet!

miyajima marathon

miyajima marathon

 miyajima marathon

We were given a finisher’s certificate and commemorative towel each, which alongside our bib numbers make for some fantastic international running souvenirs. Whilst the race was extremely challenging I enjoyed it so much, and it is one of my most treasured memories of our two weeks in Japan.

We spent the rest of the day wandering around the enchanting island, wishing that we were staying longer. You can climb all the way to the top of Mount Misen and explore the various shrines and temples on the way, but sadly we just didn’t have time to do everything. The cherry blossoms made already stunning views utterly breathtaking, and whenever we return to Japan, I will definitely hope to spend a couple of nights on Miyajima so I can explore all the sights in full.

Here are some of my favourite snaps from Miyajima; I will write up our Japan trip in a different post with more pictures and stories next week. Until then you can see more on my Instagram account if you’re not already following! This weekend sees us head to London for the Marathon (Kynon running, myself supporting) and I will also be attending The Running Awards as a guest of Strava, who have invited their top 100 running bloggers along to a special event.

miyajima marathon

miyajima marathon

miyajima marathon

miyajima marathon

miyajima marathon

miyajima marathon

miyajima marathon

Have you ever been to Japan? Did you visit Miyajima?

Where is the most exotic place you have raced?

Are you running the London Marathon this weekend? Good luck!

Return to Aberdeen parkrun

aberdeen parkrun logo

Attending Aberdeen parkrun used to be a key part of my Saturday morning running when I lived in Aberdeen, with a couple of miles run to the start for a warm up and a couple of miles back afterwards usually making a nice 10 mile start to my weekend. Now that  I live a good 15 miles away it is far less convenient and an early morning trip up is usually only been made once or twice a year. When my friend Naomi invited me for dinner last Friday, with use of her spare room and a trip to Aberdeen parkrun in the morning, I was delighted to see that my calendar was actually free and looked forward to a return visit.

Although I was shocked to see that my last visit was actually in May 2014, I was not altogether surprised. As a dyed in the wool ultrarunner, parkruns, 5km races and anything 10k and under generally scares the crap out of me and I avoid them like the plague unless I have a temporary change of heart and fancy a change. Afterwards, I remember why I consider anything of marathon distance and shorter to be too much work and avoid them again for months on end. I wouldn’t say I’m stuck in my ways, but…if I’m going to feel *that* bad at the end of a run, I like it to be because I’ve been running for 25 hours, not 25 minutes.

However, it had clearly been long enough for me to forget the pain of an all-out 5km sprint, so going to Aberdeen parkrun on a Saturday morning in January sounded like a super idea. For those who aren’t familiar; the course is an out-and back along the beach promenade, and is mainly flat apart from a gentle 200m incline at the start and a couple of cruel dips where the esplanade lowers to allow vehicular access to the beach. A run at Aberdeen beach, parkrun or not, can either be an utterly stunning, life-affirming experience, or a hellish battle of the mind and legs as you fight against cruel sea winds and biblical precipitation.

aberdeen parkrun beach bbc

photograph – bbc   

Beautiful!

Nope.

Luckily on the 23rd of January we were blessed with views similar to the former of the above two example, albeit with a chilling wind. After a two mile jog of a warm up I was ready to go alongside nearly 300 happy parkrunners and shot off when the hooter went, wondering what I’d got myself into.

Since I’ve been working on building up speed this month, I wanted to give the 3.1 miles my absolute all and get a good benchmark for the start of the year. My 5k PB is 24:18 which was set in May 2014 one week after I had ran the 53 mile Highland Fling for the second time. Being able to run that fast after a 53 mile race made no sense to me at the time and still doesn’t; but it’s just one of these things I just shall not question. I wasn’t expecting to get anywhere near my PB, but I wanted a solid, steady effort. My trick at parkrun in the past has been to post a massive positive split with a good minute in difference between my first and third split, so I wanted to show I’d learned at least something in the last few years and commit to a strong pace at the start and maintain it.

My interval sessions have been conducted at 8 minute miles since the start of the year, so I was pleased when my watch beeped for the first mile showing an 8:03. That was my challenge then – to bash out another two of those. It felt reasonably comfortable with the exception of the first 1.5 miles being into a light wind which meant I was constantly pushing harder than I’d have liked, but I know the reward would come on the return leg.

The second mile beeped with 8:04 and I was really pleased, but now the familiar burning feeling of death was creeping into my legs and lungs. Naomi passed me at the start of the third mile and maintained a tantalising 20 meter lead; chasing her pulled me forward as I adopted the crazed, wild eyed, tongue-lolling expression of someone in the last kilometer of a 5km run.

laser eye cat

After the recent storms we’ve had up here, there was a lot of thick sand from the beach up on the esplanade which was a real energy sapper. I tried to pick out smart ways to cross the massive piles and avoid the deepest sections, but it was pretty much unavoidable. There was a photographer sneakily positioned somewhere towards the end of the Promenade who was capturing the grimaces right before the final turn and the last 400m sprint to the finish line; it’s reassuring to know I looked as good as I felt here.

aberdeen parkrun aberdeen beach

Photograph – Stuart Bell 

After crossing the line and the customary 20 seconds of will I/won’t I throw up my breakfast feelings, I got my barcode scanned and checked my watch. Much to my delight I saw the third mile clocked at 8:04 to make three almost identical splits, and I’d finished in 25:03. For someone as allergic to running fast as I have been recently, I’m very pleased with that result for the first measured effort of the year and look forward to a return visit to Aberdeen parkrun next month to hopefully see continued progress. Last year I failed to even try to make any improvement in my road distance personal bests, so in 2016 I’d like to see considerable improvement across them all!

Are you a parkrun addict?
What are your speed goals for this year?

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