Red Wine Runner

A Scottish Running Blog

Tag: running (page 2 of 26)

Summer Running

It’s been a busy few weeks at Red Wine Towers and there are a lot of changes afoot. In the midst of it all I’ve been continuing to train as I’ve set myself some goals for the summer. ¬†Let’s take a look at what I’ve got planned!

12th of June – Strathearn Marathon

strathearn marathon

After helping out and marshalling at the Cateran Trail races a couple of weeks ago, I came home with a lingering case of race envy. With nothing in my calendar until July and some itchy racing feet, I sneaked a little entry into this small but beautiful marathon. Renowned for its friendliness, the Strathearn Harriers put on a great show every year and the race has a super reputation. Naomi and I are heading down together and are very excited about the Squirrel medal we will be earning. I’ll be using this race as a gauging point for how I’m feeling and how much work needs to be done over the summer, with a goal of cruising around in 4hr 30ish.

3rd of July – Stonehaven Half Marathon

stonehaven half marathon

A return to my very first half marathon, except this year the course has totally changed! The course is now multi-terrain and takes runners from sea level all the way up 1000ft of elevation to Fetteresso Forest for a bit of a run around, before coming back down to the sea. The race has only grown its reputation for being the toughest half in Scotland, as now instead of the first 4.5 miles being up hill, it’s 7 miles of straight up hill. There’s no denying it; it’s going to hurt, but as long as I can get to the top then it’s a fun cruise back to town.

31st July – Fort William Marathon

fort william marathon

I won a place in this race a few months ago when I entered a competition on Twitter. The race starts and finishes at the Nevis Range mountain resort and takes in a circular route via Inverlochy, Gairlochy, and Spean Bridge. With 1200ft of elevation it’s a little bumpy, but I will be using this race as my last long training run for my final race of the summer.

20th August – Speyside Way Ultramarathon

speyside way ultra race

After enjoying the race so much last year, I really wanted to come back and give it another go. This year I am not attempting a half marathon the next day, so I am planning on target-training for this race specifically and going as fast as I can. Last year I ran over 7 hours, so I’d like to get a lot closer to 6 or maybe even under. Kynon is also doing the race so it will be a fun day out ūüôā

As for the rest of the year, well I’ll figure that out when I get there. The changes I mentioned above will have quite an affect on what I get up to, because I won’t be living in Stonehaven any more! In fact, this time next week I’ll be packing the last of my bags and shipping off down to Edinburgh to start a new job. It’s all very exciting and I’m really pleased to be taking the next step in my career. This means that I’m on the look out for a new running club to train with and will sadly be hanging up my black and purple Stonehaven Kit. Ironically I’ve just renewed my membership and ordered a new hoodie, but I’ll always keep SRC as my second claim club whilst I’m in Scotland.

I’m really excited to be moving back to a big city again, but it will mean a lot less easy access to mountains to run up and forests to round around. We are truly spoiled in Aberdeenshire, but then which other city can claim to have a volcano in the centre of it? Arthur’s Seat and Salisbury Crags will shortly become my new back garden so there will be no excuses for getting my legs primed for hills.

What’s on your calendar this summer?
What’s your favourite thing to do in Edinburgh?

 

 

 

Glen Lyon Ultra – Race Preview

Did you know I’m off to Glen Lyon tomorrow to run a 30 mile race? I did, kind of… I don’t know about you but April this year has evaporated at such a speed I feel like this race has crept up on me a lot quicker that I ever expected it to!

glen lyon ultra

So what’s the Glen Lyon Ultra?

The Glen Lyon Ultra is a brand new race from BaM Racing, stalwarts of the Scottish Ultra scene and organisers of Glen Ogle 33, Great Glen Ultra, and Glenmore 24. They like a race in a Glen, you see.  The race route was first used a few years ago when a company ran an event called the Tigh Nam Bodach 50k in December. For some reason the race never took off and it just faded away after the first year, but it is back with the BaM treatment and looking like a great Spring adventure taking place at a far more hospitable time of year.

glen lyon ultra david downey

Picture – David Downey

Where is Glen Lyon?

Glen Lyon is…in the middle of nowhere. This is a really remote race, high up in the hills in Central Scotland, properly off grid whilst technically still in Perthshire. It’s a three hour drive from Stonehaven, the last hour of which covers only 23 miles on single track roads towards a hamlet called Pubil. To this end, we are staying in Aberfeldy tonight to maximise the amount of sleep tonight in order to arrive in time for the 9.30am start.

glen lyon ultra route

What is the weather situation?

Well, it doesn’t actually look too bad – perfect weather for running if the forecast is correct. That part of Scotland can get extremely cold at any time of year though so I’ll be taking an array of kit. I’m a little sad that we’ll be missing the relative heatwave on Sunday, but perhaps it’s for the best given my usual failure to perform in heat. Unfortunately Stonehaven is on the wrong side of the weather front on Sunday, so I won’t be able to recover in any warm sunshine like you might find in Perthshire!

glen lyon ultra weather

So what’s the plan?

Any regular readers will know that 2016 has really been any but regular for me in terms of training. I AM training – an assortment of gym work, club running sessions, half marathon length runs, but LONG long runs have been largely non existent, and as for long¬†off road stuff…the less said about that the better. The reason for this massive change in training has been because of having no big events to train for – no D33, no Fling, no Cateran, no WHW/Great Glen – all of the events which have shaped my training over the last few years have been absent from my schedule, and there’s little to no point in dragging your body through high mileage training for no reason. I’ve had a tough few years and perhaps this little break has been good physically. Mentally it doesn’t feel very ok though. Why no races? Well, to put it bluntly; when they all opened last year/early this year, I really didn’t think we’d be living in Scotland. But we still are. So make of that what you will.

Anyway; I’m not too worried about tomorrow. I know it will be harder than it ought to be, but endurance doesn’t go away and I expect it will just take a little while for me to settle into my groove. I’m really looking forward to a long run out in the hills; I’m going to take it easy and soak up the surroundings, enjoy the company of my fellow ultra runners who I simply haven’t seen enough of this year, and use the race as an opportunity to mentally reset and try and get to a place where I can at least regconise myself as an athlete again.

glen lyon ultra route profile

Are you running a race this weekend?

Have you ever been to Glen Lyon?

Am I going to survive that dirty vertical after 26 miles?!

Earn The Right

Inside my front door, there are thirteen pairs of running shoes which belong to me. ¬†Make your way up the stairs, and you’ll pass coat hooks with several running jackets hanging next to a fuel belt and a couple of hydration packs. If you stray into the kitchen, you might open a cupboard and see boxes of energy¬†gels, flapjacks, protein bars, and a shelf of various paraphernalia; a head torch, a packet of Compeed, a half used roll of athletic tape.

Walking into the living room, a bookshelf dominates one wall: ‘Born to Run, ‘Eat and Run’, ‘Why We Run’, ‘Run or Die’, ‘Runner’, ‘Running for Women’, ‘Relentless Forward Progress’, autobiographies of Mo Farah, Jessica Ennis, Paula Radcliffe, with several issues of Like The Wind magazine piled on top. Behind the couch is a pile of medals, sprawling in a mess since their collective hanging weight nearly pulled a light fitting off the wall last month. The focal point¬†of the room is the fireplace; in the centre of the mantlepiece is a crystal goblet, flanked on either side by several other small mementos, quaichs, and plaques. Anyone would think that a runner lived in this house.

West Highland Way Triple Crown

Much thought has been given in the past as to at what point it is permissible to call oneself a ‘runner’. Many people incorporate a small amount of running as part of a larger training regime, but they would not call themselves a ‘runner’. Some people will run five days a week but never compete in a race, thus will refuse to call themselves a ‘runner’. There is also the elitist mindset that believes that someone moving at anything less than a certain pace is a jogger, not a runner. I’ve always been of the mindset that if you run, then you’re a runner.

So what am I, if I have not been running?

Regardless of what speed you move at, you have to actually partake in the activity to be a part of it. You can own all the running shoes in the world, but unless you are running in them then you are not a runner. You have to earn the right to call yourself a runner. Since entering life without a structured training plan, in the last few months I’ve been feeling like I’ve been slipping further and further away from the title, leading to somewhat of a loss of identity at times. My monthly mileage from September to December 2015 even when combined does not exceed or even remotely equal the total achieved in each month in the early part of the year, which is a strange situation to find oneself in when you are commonly referred to as an ‘ultrarunner’.

West Highland Way Race

Training for completion of the West Highland Way Race and the accompanying Triple Crown races was such a long labour of love that it almost felt natural to step back for a little while and reassess where I wanted to go next. The combination of that step back, complete dedication to the completion and submission of my MSc in October, and perhaps an added sprinkle of residual over-training syndrome or cumulative fatigue has led to a different situation at the start of 2016 РI have no idea what my goals are, still. Having no plans whatsoever was fun at first Рa totally open calendar felt like an amazing opportunity, but now having still found no direction I feel I am flailing a bit.

To this end, I decided not to indulge in the blogger’s bread and butter in December and post¬†a 2015 round up. To me it didn’t make sense to conclude one year without a clear vision for the next. Taking a brief look back though, despite going out with a fizzle rather than a bang, 2015 was alright.

Another PB at the D33:

d33 ultra

An amazing 1hr 21m PB at the Highland Fling – a race I still credit as my strongest yet:

hoka highland fling

Photo by Clark Hamilton

Finally getting *that* Goblet:

west highland way race 2015

Finishing the Devil o’the Highlands, and achieving the Triple Crown, hand in hand in the pouring rain with my husband:

devil o the highlands race 2015

Photo by Clark Hamilton

Submitting my MSc and heading off to Berlin to fun-run the marathon:

berlin marathon finish

And graduating. The work was worth it, and I passed with a Distinction:

Graduation

So how on earth does one follow a year like that? Without major goals, I need to re-immerse myself slowly. I need to re-earn the right to call myself a runner again. I’ve already had a couple of false starts at getting into a training routine; ¬†partially due to my work situation¬†at the moment, it’s challenging just to get into and keep a routine in general.

Earn the right

[Embedded video link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0B-SIJedZJg]

Once upon a time I was a student at the University of Texas at Austin. Even now over a decade later, I still follow the football programme avidly and my blood still flows burnt orange as a lifelong Longhorn fan. The Texas Longhorns have a great YouTube channel and the above video stuck with me the first time I watched it. Despite it now being a few years old I often rewatch it when I need a boost or a reminder why I need to keep working every single day.

“We constantly say that you’re not given anything in life. Even if you’re given an opportunity, you have to earn the right to keep it.”

I’m lucky in that my hiatus from running has been more or less a choice. Many are not so lucky and have been sidelined by injury or other circumstances. It has been humbling to go back out and find that running 8 miles without a break is quite exhausting, humbling to be reminded that the speed I once had is no longer there, and downright frustrating when I’m reminded how much harder it is to run when you’re carrying an extra stone around. The saying “Once a runner, always a runner” may be true, but for me I want to earn the right to keep it.

So what’s the plan?

I’d like to try some different things this year. After four consecutive Springs of training for the D33 Ultra and three training for the Highland Fling, it was almost a relief when I realised I was not going to be free on either race weekend in 2016. I will miss the social for sure, but this is forcing me to look beyond my usual routine and push me out of my comfort zone. You don’t get any better by doing the same things every year!

To this end I’ve decided to focus on the Sri Chinmoy Perth 50k at the end of March, and choose an Autumn marathon to target train for and really claw back some speed. I won a place on twitter for the Fort William Marathon in July, and I’m considering if I would like to return to the Devil o’the Highlands for a second time. ¬†Other than that, my calendar is wide open and I’m looking for new races to try.

What’s on your 2016 calendar?
Are you setting any new goals?
Do you have any suggestions for new races I should run?

Fraserburgh Half Marathon 2015 – RACE REPORT

Fraserburgh Half Marathon 2015
15th November
fraserburgh half marathon medal

2 hours 16 minutes 12 seconds
209th of 249 Finishers
90th of 122 Females
29th of 36 Female Seniors

 

The Fraserburgh Half Marathon has been one of my favourite local races for a long time now, and is a great way to round off the running season. In the past it has always been one last test for my legs as it is a¬†mostly flat and fast course with great PB potential, and I reset my Half Marathon PB here last year when I recorded 1hr 53m 58s in truly awful conditions. This year was sadly never going to be about speed; I DNS’d my place at Glen Ogle 33 Ultra last weekend as I knew I wasn’t fit to complete the race happily, but I knew that I’d be able run (but not race) a half marathon distance without too much of a strain and would enjoy returning to the race for the fourth time.

I picked up Naomi¬†at 8.30am from Aberdeen in the pouring rain. Since I had long resigned myself that the race was to be a run (and an uncomfortable one at that) I wasn’t too fussed about the grim weather and just accepted it as another added difficulty for the day. I had done myself no favours by prepping for the race by spending the afternoon in the pub in Edinburgh with some friends, eating a delicious curry, and then getting the last train back to Stonehaven. Naomi, on the other hand, had completed the Illuminator 15 mile run the previous night, so neither of us were in shape for anything other than a Long Slow Run with cake at the end.

IMG_6463

After registering we headed back to the car to keep warm. It was mainly dry in the Broch but the sea breeze was brutal. Since a mild Autumn and two weeks in the States has completely broken my ability to be resilient to the Scottish winter, I took no chances with my attire and wore long tights, gloves, and a thermal top over my t-shirt. Rather than my Stonehaven Running Club top, I decided to wear my 2013 Paris Marathon finishers t-shirt to honour the horrific events of Friday night and observed that several others had done the same.

At about 10:45am we headed back to the Pavillion to meet up with others and complain about the cold. The Broch Half is always very wintery but at least it was nowhere near as wet as last year. At 11am sharp the gun went off and the crowd of runners made their way down the street and out of the town towards the countryside.

fraserburgh half marathon 2015

Image courtesy of Broch Photo House / Facebook

 

fraserburgh half marathon 2015

Image courtesy of Broch Photo House / Facebook

 

We ran steadily through the first two¬†miles to the first water point and took a drink whilst walking. It was pleasant to run through the woods and appreciate the Autumnal surroundings without constantly worrying about pace or drinking water too quickly and getting a stitch. When we had talked about the race before the start we thought about executing a regulated run/walk strategy such as run 0.9/walk 0.1, but in the end we were running at such a steady pace that we didn’t feel the need to walk other than at one or two random points¬†and just chatted our way around the course as the miles slipped by.

As ever the course was very well marshaled and although the roads are obviously open, there was very little traffic. The race had decided to trial an early start wave at 10am this year for those who thought they might take longer than 2:30, to allow them to enjoy the same support at the finish as the majority of racers. Several of the early start wave passed us on their return to town and it was great to cheer them on and give them a high five. I think in principal it worked well and it certainly seems that the runners who took the early start found it to be a benefit, but in future I think it should be an option you tick when you register. Runners had to request to join the early start when they registered and some had to really plead their case as they had completed a 10k quicker than the 1hr 15m benchmark which had been set to allow participation in that wave. There are plenty of reasons why someone might know they will take longer than usual in a run such as injury or accompanying a slower friend. I’m sure the organisers will come up with a slicker strategy for next year as in general it seems to have been well received.

We made our way around the ‘lollypop’ of the course and were buffeted by chilly winds and some rain in all directions, but in general the conditions were brilliant for racing. On the return to the finish, the last 1.5 miles of the route takes a looped circuit through a housing estate which brings you agonisingly close to the finish, but allows for spectators to see when their runner is approaching. Both Naomi and I’s competitive streak ignited when we saw a handful of runners up ahead and we unspeakingly picked up the pace to glide past them and finish strongly.

Fraserburgh half marathon 2015

Picture by Greg Bruce

Fraserburgh half marathon 2015

With the addition of chip timing and a headline sponsor, the finish line was a bit more lively than usual with a finishing arch, a PA system pumping out music and an announcement for each finisher. We finished together but Naomi’s chip must have been across the line before mine as she took the higher position!

After crossing the line we grabbed some water and just went straight to the car to put some warm dry clothes on. It hadn’t been raining but the drizzle had been enough to soak you through. We then headed with haste towards the South Church Hall for food and cakes…

Fraserburgh half marathon 2015

Photo by Monica Rennie

 

In addition to this there was tea, coffee and juice, six different types of soup, and trays of hot, fresh sausage rolls. They know how to do a fine piece in the Broch for sure. Thanks again to Fraserburgh Running Club for hosting another fantastic event; as ever – I will be back!

fraserburgh half marathon 2015

 

Did you race this weekend?
What’s the best post-race spread you’ve ever seen?
Have you any more races this season?

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